>>>Chronic neutrophilic leukemia: a clinical perspective

Chronic neutrophilic leukemia: a clinical perspective

Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) that includes only 150 patients described to date meeting the latest World Health
Organization (WHO) criteria and the recently reported CSF3R mutations.

Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) that includes only 150 patients described to date meeting the latest World Health Organization (WHO) criteria and the recently reported CSF3R mutations. The diagnosis is based on morphological criteria of granulocytic cells and the exclusion of genetic drivers that are known to occur in others MPNs, such as BCR-ABL1, PDGFRA/B, or FGFR1 rearrangements. However, this scenario changed with the identification of oncogenic mutations in the CSF3R gene in approximately 83% of WHO-defined and no monoclonal gammopathy-associated CNL patients. CSF3R T618I is a highly specific molecular marker for CNL that is sensitive to inhibition in vitro and in vivo by currently approved protein kinase inhibitors. In addition to CSF3R mutations, other genetic alterations have been found, notably mutations in SETBP1, which may be used as prognostic markers to guide therapeutic decisions. These findings will help to
understand the pathogenesis of CNL and greatly impact the clinical management of this disease. In this review, we discuss the new genetic alterations recently found in CNL and the clinical perspectives in its diagnosis and treatment. Fortunately, since the diagnosis of CNL is not based on exclusion anymore, the molecular characterization of the CSF3R gene must be included in the WHO criteria for CNL diagnosis.

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2018-12-17T16:19:37+00:0017 September , 2018|